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Face to Face: Sheer Minerals v. Leading Brands

Hello Natural Beauties,

Mineral makeup is everywhere!  Almost every leading makeup brand has a version of it. The name in and of itself makes you feel like you are doing something good and healthy for your skin. Minerals are naturally occurring, so therefore…but wait, don’t be too hasty in plucking one of those pretty packages with the wholesome looking goddess off of the shelf. If what you put on your face is important to you, and I’m guessing it is or you wouldn’t be here, then lets take a look at some of the common ingredients of some leading brands of “mineral” makeup and why you WON’T find any of these in the Sheer Minerals Makeup Collection.

Talc:  Yes, it is a mineral.  While there is concern about talc in its natural form containing asbestos, the www.cancer.org site suggests that a purified form used in consumer products does not. However, talc, used as a filler in mineral makeup, can clog pores.

Bismuth Oxychloride: Yes, pure Bismuth is a mineral and is used as a thickener and absorbing agent in some products. However, Bismuth Oxychloride is not.  Bismuth oxychloride is manufactured by combining bismuth, a by-product of lead and copper metal refining, with chloride and water. It's used in cosmetics because it has an iridescent, pearly appearance. It is desirable in cosmetics for its ability to adhere to the skin.  Bismuth oxychloride was permanently listed by the FDA as a coloring agent in 1977 and as a synthetic ingredient. Many people react to this ingredient in makeup in the way of redness, hot or itchy skin and cystic breakouts.

Carmine: NOT a mineral. To prepare carmine, insect bodies are boiled in ammonia or a sodium carbonate solution,  then filtered, and alum is added to the clear salt solution of carminic acid to create the red aluminum salt, called "carmine lake" or "crimson lake." Bugs!

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